February 20, 2018

February 20, 2018

February 20, 2018

February 20, 2018

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HOW ENERGY EFFICIENT IS YOUR HOME ?

February 20, 2018

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HOW ENERGY EFFICIENT IS YOUR HOME ?

February 20, 2018

 

Replacing old windows with new, high performance, energy-efficient windows can be pricey. And, once you do decide that the long-term energy-savings are worth the initial investment, swapping those single-paned energy-suckers with dual-pane (or even triple-pane!) replacements can be a complicated process. The options are endless. Do you want the window glass (called glazing) clear or with a bronze tint? Do you want aluminum framing or wood … or maybe even a hybrid composite? And what type of gas would you like between the panes? Argon or krypton? And how about a low-E coating?

A multiple benefits fact sheet is now available which combines several measurable attributes (annual energy cost, peak demand, winter and summer thermal comfort, and condensation) to assist in the window selection process.

 

View Here –>> Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC).

 

The EWC is committed to manufacture and promote energy-efficient windows. This site provides unbiased information on the benefits of energy-efficient windows, descriptions of how they work, and recommendations for their selection and use.
Good Windows safe you money on energy costs

 

Selecting a window or skylight involves many considerations such as appearance, energy performance, human factor issues, technical performance, and cost. This fact sheet combines several measurable attributes (annual energy cost, peak demand, winter and summer thermal comfort, and condensation) to assist in the selection process.

 

Making purchasing decisions based on one attribute, such as energy performance, may not always lead to a completely balanced outcome. For example, two windows that are similar in their effect on annual energy use may be very different in their condensation resistance or in the comfort they provide at extreme temperatures.

Annual energy costs and peak demand are simulated using the computer program, RESFEN. The range of results for a given city are divided into three groups designated as below average, average and above average. Similarly, results of the Winter and Summer Thermal Comfort Index developed at the University of California, Berkeley, and the National Fenestration Rating Council’s (NFRC) condensation rating (CR) are divided into three groups as well.

 

 

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